fyeah-history
fyeah-history:

Four Hausa gun carriers of the South Nigerian Regiment in traditional clothing (1902 photo by John Benjamin Stone)The Hausa (autonyms for singular: Bahaushe; plural Hausawa and general: Hausa/Haoussa; exonyms being Ausa, Mgbakpa, Kado, Al-Takari and Abakwariga) are one of the largest ethnic groups in West Africa. They live primarily in the Sahelian and Sudanian areas of northern Nigeria and southeastern Niger, with significant numbers also living in parts of Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Chad, Togo, Ghana, and Sudan. The Hausa are a minority in every country they reside in except Niger, where they constitute the majority. 

fyeah-history:

Four Hausa gun carriers of the South Nigerian Regiment in traditional clothing (1902 photo by John Benjamin Stone)
The Hausa (autonyms for singular: Bahaushe; plural Hausawa and general: Hausa/Haoussa; exonyms being Ausa, Mgbakpa, Kado, Al-Takari and Abakwariga) are one of the largest ethnic groups in West Africa. They live primarily in the Sahelian and Sudanian areas of northern Nigeria and southeastern Niger, with significant numbers also living in parts of Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Chad, Togo, Ghana, and Sudan. The Hausa are a minority in every country they reside in except Niger, where they constitute the majority. 

thestuartkings
thestuartkings:






Sir Benjamin Stone, ‘Westminster Abbey 1896 Wax effigy of King Charles II’

Westminster, London, England
Photograph by Sir Benjamin Stone
Made soon after Charles’s death in February 1685, this life-size  effigy stood over the king’s grave for 150 years. It then moved to the  Islip Chapel, where it was photographed by Stone, and is now in the  Abbey museum. The figure is dressed in the robes of the Order of the  Garter, possibly those of the king himself.

thestuartkings:

Sir Benjamin Stone, ‘Westminster Abbey 1896 Wax effigy of King Charles II’

Westminster, London, England

Photograph by Sir Benjamin Stone

Made soon after Charles’s death in February 1685, this life-size effigy stood over the king’s grave for 150 years. It then moved to the Islip Chapel, where it was photographed by Stone, and is now in the Abbey museum. The figure is dressed in the robes of the Order of the Garter, possibly those of the king himself.

hannahrose1989photography

hannahreynoldsphotography:

Although Benjamin Stone is remembered in the history of photography as being an early recorder of English society, he was primarily a politician. Because of this, he had access to parts of the parliamentary system that no other photographer could have hoped to have gained. With this in mind, I…